Links for October 14, 2006

It has been a long time since I posted regularly and it’s because I’m busy, tired and thinking way too much about what’s going on. So I thought I’d throw up a few links to keep everyone interested and soon I will be posting some new thoughts and experiences I’ve been having.

Phil, my friend since I’ve been four, is married and his wife Steph has begun a blog and has already been posting some great thoughts on consumerism and how to live it Jesus in the face of it.
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Gordie is in Grade 10, that means he can’t drive yet. He is reading a McLaren book and not understanding it so he goes out and buys a bible dictionary and starts challenging what he is reading with some scholarly facts. His findings are interesting and I am still blown away that he is so young and so far beyond his years.
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This is a great post on how maybe building a safe place before community is a bit too much like the suburbs.
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Another interesting take on why protesting doesn’t work anymore.
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Joe posts about his time at the pastors conference, in Ottawa and in Kingston, complete with pictures.
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David Fitch is one of those guys I have the utmost respect for and even after reading through his book a few times I am still floored by it. NextReformation points to this quote.

“What Sider did not consider is that these ways of quantifying justice might perpetuate the ills of capitalism and democracy upon the poor. What goes unnoticed is that part of rectifying that injustice in this way assumes the sucking of all the poor into the full rigors of the agonistic system of capitalism. Perhaps those who make $56,902 have a nice house but live a nonstop, stress-filled lifestyle in which they never see or spend time at the local church or with their children. Maybe the two-income family has to shove their children into a day care facility three days a week in order to participate in $56,902 a year. Maybe addictions like unhealthy eating at McDonald’s just to have time to eat are a necessary part of the two-income, capitalistic-driven character of life in society. Even worse, maybe these capitalistic ways would spatialize the poor into relationships of contract and exchange incapable of communing with another as a unity in Christ. Maybe this is a life of capitalistic justice Christians should wish on no one…”

Read more about what David Fitch has to say on Justice here or just click here right now and buy his book. It is a must read and its only ten bucks.

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